Crappie preservation?

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  • Crappie preservation?

    Posted by OkieCindy on October 16, 2022 at 8:09 pm

    Does anyone know any other way to preserve crappie (white fish, not oily) besides freezing? Extension says to freeze. I fish almost everyday, so have quite a bit frozen.

    DeepSouthBamaGRITS replied 1 year, 1 month ago 7 Members · 18 Replies
  • 18 Replies
  • Squeeze

    Member
    October 17, 2022 at 1:11 am

    If you fillet them boneless, can them like tuna, if not pickle them like herring and pick the bones later

    • OkieCindy

      Member
      October 19, 2022 at 5:19 pm

      I do fillet them. And use instead of tuna in my sandwich spreads.

  • Jen-in-Ok

    Member
    October 18, 2022 at 1:55 pm

    hey, if you do can them, tell us how they turned out! I got perch over here…. maybe I should go fishing too.. : )

    • OkieCindy

      Member
      October 19, 2022 at 5:21 pm

      Will do! Canner has salsa in it now, will try later today.

    • OkieCindy

      Member
      October 30, 2022 at 1:56 pm

      I canned in pint and waited a few days to try it. It does taste a little more fishy this way, but after making a ‘tuna’ salad with it, it was good. Not as good as fresh or frozen but definitely edible.

      • Jen-in-Ok

        Member
        October 31, 2022 at 4:43 am

        I’m ok with a bit of stonger flavor. I’m going to have to try it. I’m tired of stuff getting lost in the deepfreeze and getting freezerburnt. thank you for doing the taste test!

  • OkieCindy

    Member
    October 19, 2022 at 5:15 pm

    I haven’t tried it yet, but would think it would be able to be used as fish salad sandwiches or in casseroles calling for tuna. I do make fresh tuna salad from simmered crappie and it’s so much better than tuna!

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 4 months ago by  OkieCindy.
  • DeepSouthBamaGRITS

    Member
    November 30, 2022 at 3:46 pm

    I have canned salmon, mackerel, Red Snapper, catfish & crappie. ALL have turned out great. (I’ve also canned shrimp & oysters).

    No oil needs to be added to an OILY fish like salmon, tuna, mackerel, etc.

    When canning lean fish like crappie or catfish, cod, halibut, etc., up to 4 tablespoons of olive oil or vegetable oil may be added to each pint jar. (I use 2 tablespoons in pint jars, 1 tbsp in 1/2 pints). The oil will add moisture to the fish but will also increase the calories (1 Tbsp of oil = 135 cal). I prefer to use Olive Oil, but that is my preference.

    Cut fish into fillets or chunks. The skin may be left on or off. Fillets can be rolled for packing in jars.
    Salt, seasoning salt, or other spices may be added to the packed fish.

    Process 1/2 pint and pint jars for 100 minutes at:

    10 psi – weighted gauge

    11 psi – dial gauge

    In case you might be interested in adding sauces to your fish, here are some good recipes:

    Sauces may be added to containers before sealing them or served with cooked canned fish. Tomato Sauce. This sauce is often added to sardines, herrings, mackerel fillets and smoked fish. Tomato “fish sauce” is a type of ketchup made from tomato pulp, vinegar, onion, salt and spices. Bay leaves and cloves are often added.

    Sugar tends to caramelize at high temperatures so it should be added in small quantities as it may darken the sauce.

    Tomato Sauce for Canned Fish

    1 qt ripe whole tomatoes

    1 Tbsp chopped parsley

    4 cloves

    1 bay leaf

    1/2 tsp salt

    1 medium onion

    1 Tbsp vinegar

    1 Tbsp Worcestersire sauce

    1/4 tsp cayenne pepper

    Smash tomatoes and simmer with other ingredients until reduced to about half of the original volume. Strain through a fine strainer.

    Mustard Sauce. This sauce is often added to sardines and other canned fish. Ingredients: mustard seed, vinegar, cayenne pepper, turmeric, salt, water.

    Add 2 Tbsp vinegar to 1 cup of water. Add 5 Tbsp. cracked mustard seeds, 1/4 tsp cayenne, 1/2 tsp turmeric. Cook in skillet for 5 minutes. Strain.

    Caution Do not use starch, flour or any artificial thickening agent.

    • OkieCindy

      Member
      December 11, 2022 at 8:44 pm

      Thanks for the information! I will be trying this!

    • Robin_Holstein

      Member
      December 24, 2022 at 8:36 am

      100 minutes? Sounds like a lot.

      • DeepSouthBamaGRITS

        Member
        December 25, 2022 at 5:34 am

        You can Google or look in Ball’s Blue Book of canning and all fish in 1/2 pints & pints call for 1 hr 40 minutes which is the same as 100 min. It is not recommended to can fish in any other size jars but 1/2 pints & pints and every recipe I’ve used thru the years call for pressure canning at 100 min-1 hr 40 min.

    • KatRay

      Member
      January 1, 2023 at 10:15 pm

      What are some ways you use canned shrimp? I’m wanting to try them canned. Thanks

      • DeepSouthBamaGRITS

        Member
        January 1, 2023 at 10:50 pm

        I LOVE Tuscany Shrimp Scampi. When times get hard I want to be able to have one of my favorite dishes on occasion. It is my recipe I kind of thew together one night on a whim and from then on, I never made plain shrimp scampy again. It has halved cherry/grape tomatoes, bell pepper, onions with a creamy tomato-like sauce (I also add Tiger Sauce to the sauce for a little zing & for the flavor)…guess that is a “southern thing”! LOL. I use either fettuccine or angel hair noodles (depending on my mood) that has been cooked & drained/rinsed & stir it all together. If the shrimp are already cooked, I just cook up the recipe and put the shrimp in at the end to warm them up. Makes a quick & EASY PEASY meal when I’m too tired to slave over the stove after a long days work on the homestead. I also use them in Shrimp Gumbo which is another favorite of us southern folk here on the Gulf Coast. I make the gumbo and when it is ready, just add the shrimp at the end to warm up.
        Some people think they will be all mushy but they are very firm after pressure canning. They are cooked in salt water with vinegar approx. 8-10 min and a salt water brine is used for the liquid for pressure canning.

        If you’ve never pressure-canned shrimp, here are instructions plus there are a few videos on YouTube that shows you step-by-step how to do it (if you are a visual learner).

        https://www.canningdiva.com/recipes/pressure-canning-shrimp-instructions/

      • KatRay

        Member
        January 2, 2023 at 12:22 pm

        Thanks! I’ll give it a try. I thought they would be rubbery but it sounds like I’m wrong!

      • DeepSouthBamaGRITS

        Member
        January 2, 2023 at 4:54 pm

        I’ve not found them to be rubbery at all. Just firm shrimp and not overcooked or mushy. I’ve used both fresh off the boat as well as sales I’ve found on frozen at local grocery. Either fresh or frozen work well for canning, (even frozen, already peeled do good, too, just thaw frozen shrimp before you add to salt/vinegar water to precook.

  • Jen-in-Ok

    Member
    October 18, 2022 at 1:57 pm

    LOL!

  • OkieCindy

    Member
    October 19, 2022 at 5:20 pm

    Lol!

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