Getting things you don’t need right now because you will later!

  • Getting things you don’t need right now because you will later!

    Posted by BiggKidd on October 14, 2022 at 12:38 am

    I know many if not all of us store the things we know we need on a daily basis. What about things you might not need for a year or two or ten?

    I just got in many pair of reading glasses in different strengths. In the last ten years I started needing reading glasses for detail work as well as reading. SO now I’m stocking up on the power of glasses I need now and the next time or two. The next time I have more expendable money I’ll order the next levels of glasses to have them on hand. Sure I might die before I need them but I might not and even if I do they will be here for whoever needs them. Right now they don’t hardly cost anything in comparison of not being able to see to solder the tiny wire that keeps the inverter going or to stitch up a bad cut on one of my kids or grandson. You guys see what I’m saying here?

    So what things will you need one day that may not be able to be bought at any price? Do you have them or plans to get them?

    Sunny2 replied 11 months, 3 weeks ago 35 Members · 101 Replies
  • 101 Replies
  • Stoutlander

    Member
    October 14, 2022 at 1:08 am

    A local nursery had an end of the year sale. Bought some pear saplings, blackberries, goji berry, and concord grape vines.

    Also sent away for some potassium iodide pills…

    • BiggKidd

      Member
      October 14, 2022 at 1:18 am

      That’s great and thinking ahead. But how about more day to day items that will stop a repair or project cold if you don’t have it.

      Fasteners is another good thing to have and as long as they stay dry nails, screws and staples never go bad.

      Much like wiring connectors and wire itself.

      • fishnbees

        Member
        November 3, 2022 at 1:15 pm

        i didnt know why, but for years before we really started prepping, i have kept all the nails i pulled from any board, any nuts and bolts from anything i pulled apart. when my grandpa passed a few decades ago, i found he had kept everything as well. Nails, nuts and bolts, scrap wood, etc. coffee cans are full of stuff!

      • Sunny2

        Member
        March 20, 2023 at 2:58 am

        If you are storing bulk quantities of nails especially for a long time it is good to put a little WD40 on them and toss it through them like mixing salad dressing into the greens in a salad. It will help preserve them to prevent rusting. It only takes a small amount.

    • PWDOhioRaptureReady

      Member
      November 29, 2022 at 2:13 am

      We got potassium iodide pills also.i bought some 20+ years ago, they are still good but I bought more about 6 months ago. I also had bought N100 NOISH masks, made in the USA about 20+ years ago and glad we had them on hand.

  • Wilburs-Place

    Member
    October 14, 2022 at 1:36 am

    Go to jasemedical.com and order antibiotics. You will receive five different types of antibiotics and an instruction manual. One of the best decisions I think I made for myself. They now offer orders for children as well. I will be placing an order for my grandchildren next.

    • BiggKidd

      Member
      October 14, 2022 at 1:45 am

      Excellent thought, point and post. One place it kind of falls down though is the very limited shelf life of most medications even when refrigerated or frozen. But lets take it a step further a herbal and mineral PDR and seeds to grow the plants and books to identify wild plants for use medicinally.

      • Wilburs-Place

        Member
        October 14, 2022 at 1:51 am

        I don’t think it falls down. It’s another supply that may come in handy in addition to other options you may choose to use.

      • BiggKidd

        Member
        October 14, 2022 at 2:01 am

        You are correct. I’m just trying to encourage people to think farther ahead and from more angles.

      • BentNeedle

        Member
        October 21, 2022 at 4:39 pm

        I just planted GoldenSeal (natural antibiotic) along with other medicinal plants that grow wild in a forest canopy. Any one of us here can grow cayenne that’s good for bleeding wounds (even to stop bleeding from a tooth extraction!) as well as heart attack, stroke and lowering blood pressure. Most people are unaware of bentonite clay used externally for staph infections, diaper rash, any type of fungal or bacterial problem including gangrene. I’ve used a clay mask beauty product containing kaolin for fire ant bites and it took the sting out forthwith. Health food stores used to sell “Aztec Secret” (external use)a powder to mix with water. Drawing capabilities are excellent and any clay doesn’t go bad on the shelf.

        I’ve also used clay internally – good for GI problems such as IBS, colitis, etc. It’s also wonderful for FOOD POISONING which is a necessity for questionable times ahead. I use Tecopia Essential edible clay but it’s out of stock now and no notice when it’s available. I’ve taken Pascalite internally with no problems. They used to market it for internal use but the FDA has clamped down doncha know. It’s mined in Wyoming. https://www.pascalite.net/ (read their FAQ)

        Sodium bentonite swells to 10x it’s own weight where calcium bentonite is non-swelling. A blend of both is ideal but internally either can be used. Start with 1/4 tsp mixed in water using a plastic spoon and wait an hour to see if a 2nd dose is needed. It’s far superior to Pepto Bismal and for loose stools you’ll know when the “plug” is working lol. Stay hydrated too. Do not use Aztec Secret internally. Way too powerful!

        Disclaimer: just anecdotes here, more than a passing interest in medicinal herbs with many years of self experimentation. My supply of “fish” antibiotics has long expired but not a problem with fresh roots. I’d also suggest growing white willow for it’s bark (headache remedy before commercial aspirin was invented) and since we’re going back to medieval times….basket weaving.

        Apologies for the tome.

      • KimC

        Member
        October 21, 2022 at 11:45 pm

        Great info. What zone do you grow goldenseal in? I tried it in 9b, after paying a hefty price for a small starter plant, and it didn’t make it. Any growing tips would be appreciated. I might try again. Thanks.

        Also, something I haven’t seen anyone else mention yet: I’ve stocked Melaleuca essential oil for decades (original high quality tea tree oil that comes in at least two strengths; I get mine from Melaleuca.com). In my experience, it works amazingly well on just about everything (think of the analogy of Windex from the My Big Fat Greek Wedding movie that the dad claimed was a cure-all for any ailment, only better). It’s antiviral, antibacterial, antiseptic, etc. Can be added to water to spritz the air to remove germs, removes bug bite pain on contact, great for scratches, helps stop bleeding quickly (not for a huge gash, but for small cuts works well), great added to salt water gargle for sore throat, speeds skin healing and reduces scarring, prevents/fights infection. I swab my nasal passages with it on a q-tip before using nasal spray when I feel a cold or possible sinus infection coming on. Works quickly to prevent fever blisters when used as soon as the tingling feeling occurs, and reduces the length of a bout when used often early on. Clears sores in the mouth quickly, especially when used early or on first discovery. It even helps prevent bruising and gets rid of bruises quickly, as well as aids lotion or muscle rub with its deep penetrating properties. Don’t ever put it in your eyes. Be careful where you buy it because there are a lot of lesser quality versions sold that won’t really work. The brand I buy has never failed me. I can’t think of a single injury of issue I’ve had that it hasn’t at least helped, if not actually fixed. I’ve used it for over three decades and am 100% sold on its benefits. If I could choose only one essential oil, it is my go-to.

      • Rox

        Member
        October 24, 2022 at 6:05 am

        Loved your tome. I’m also interested in learning more about natural remedies, started looking for Darryl Patton resources. I’m curious where did you get the goldenseal?

        A friend of mine has been in the hospital and now a nursing home for almost a month. Somehow he contracted a ‘rare’ bacteria that destroys bones. It seems the drs and infectious disease specialists more interested in the bacteria than helping him get well. Sadly western medicine in many cases a big disappointment. I keep wondering if there is something natural on God’s earth that might help him fight the bacteria and recover.

        Probably more than you needed to hear, your comments just got me wondering how much knowledge has been lost (intentional or unintentional) that might help people.

      • KimC

        Member
        October 24, 2022 at 4:17 pm

        <div>Hi Rox. Thanks for the kind feedback. I can’t recall exactly, but think I bought the goldenseal plant from Well Spring Gardens online. They carry a lot of things, but some are intermittent or just seasonal. I have bought several times from them in the past and had pretty good results overall. I think the goldenseal I purchased probably needed a better location than I put it in or some more specific care than I knew to give it. I can’t remember now (since it’s been a few years) if it was even rated for zone 9b where I am. </div>

        I also bought goldenseal powder at my local health food store that sells many bulk herbs along with all kinds of books, supplements and remedies for just about everything. Maybe there’s one near you that carries it? It wasn’t cheap, but I stocked enough to treat at least a couple of infections. They also sell capsules to put it in for those that want to invest in that.

        So sorry to hear about your friend. I think comfrey is supposed to be very good as a poultice for many skin and bone issues. Might research that? Rosemary Gladstar wrote many books on herbs and remedies. There are a lot of books out there by many authors on natural healing. I hope you find something that works. Have you checked Niti the Farmacist in these forums? Or the new Clinic forum? Could be worth posting something there. I’ll bet there’s someone here that knows something that could be helpful. I wish I knew more. Something to always be learning about.

        We have definitely given up so much natural medicine knowledge for the ‘promise’ of pharmacological benefits that are either mostly elusive or nonexistent and only benefit the bottom line of big pharma.

        Blessings, Kim

      • Rox

        Member
        October 25, 2022 at 4:08 am

        I have been wanting to plant comfrey but never seem to be able to find a plant or the seeds here in Central IL.

      • KimC

        Member
        October 25, 2022 at 4:16 am

        Perma Pastures Farm sells comfrey, but it may be late in the season for it now. I believe Well Spring Gardens online also sells it, at least seasonally, or did in the past. I have a few plants from before that struggled this year and I lost many, including new ones planted in spring, due to our intense heat. Even my more established plants I had for a couple of years that had done well previously really didn’t do well this time around. None of mine are big enough to divide yet, or I would offer some to you. Maybe someone else here who has fully mature plants could split theirs for you if they see this? I hope someone connects with you about it.

      • KimC

        Member
        October 24, 2022 at 4:54 pm

        Just thought of something else: Have they/you tried manuka honey (the highest rated) or medi-honey? I’ve read testimonials of people with the little red line going from and injury/infection through their skin heading to the heart (as in blood poisoning, I believe) being healed by keeping the honey on it 24/7 and at least one said they did nothing else medically. I thought it was quite a claim, but hey, whatever works, right?!

        Of course, prayer goes without saying, but you might also want to post a prayer request for your friend in the Church forum, in the discussion called Prayer Requests and Praise Reports.

        Take care.

      • Rox

        Member
        October 25, 2022 at 4:06 am

        Thank you so much KimC for your replies and prayer. So many distractions these days. Hopefully I will find this thread again (I just joined yesterday so expect a learning curve). I definitely have an interest in medicinal herbs and the lost knowledge related to healing and life in general. I’m reseaching for my friend but also for me (misdiagnosed Lyme & coinfections for 10 years). I’m also trying to help an elderly dad from 400 miles away, who has many issues. .I know we’re not given more than we can handle but some days I wonder, but for the grace of God. I look forward to connecting again Lord willing.

        Blessings to you also,

        Roxie

      • KimC

        Member
        October 25, 2022 at 4:48 am

        <div>Hi again Roxie. I can SO relate with distractions and overwhelm, and family challenges. You are NOT alone. There is a supportive community here, and the Lord will never leave you or forsake you. </div>

        Find threads that you’ve interacted in by going to your own profile and checking your Timeline (it’s a tab). I’m still learning the ins and outs of the site myself, but it’s pretty intuitive overall. You can also make connections with specific people for private messages, and subscribe to or join the various forums, discussions or groups you want to stay connected with.

        Here’s a link that you may find helpful/informative regarding Lyme Disease. It’s an interview with a very knowledgable doctor done by a YT channel that used to be called The Reluctant Prepper. Since I watched these years ago, he’s changed his channel name, but the content from the past appears to be intact.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WlQukRz_Rj8

        And here’s a YT sort of all of Dr. Nielsen’s interviews on that channel on various topics. Hopefully helpful!

        https://www.youtube.com/c/LibertyandFinance/search?query=dr%20jay%20nielsen

        Be blessed in Jesus’ name!

        Kim

      • KimC

        Member
        December 18, 2022 at 10:15 pm

        Hi Rox. Haven’t seen you on here for several weeks and wanted to check in to see that you’re okay. Hope you are well. God bless, KimC

      • Stitchinglady

        Member
        October 25, 2022 at 12:21 am

        ❤ your ideas and I plan on obtaining some of those things!

      • BentNeedle

        Member
        October 31, 2022 at 3:43 pm

        I bought the roots from ebay sellers for around a buck apiece. The goldenseal (seller: prettylittleorchids_15) hasn’t come up but it’s purported to be slow and may not come up until spring. I’m in zone 8a. The true comfrey (seller: shastastar) came up – all of them and the Bocking 14 (seller: treasuresold-new) all came up albeit a little slower than the true variety. Yup, there are sellers offering better quality (probably bigger roots) at much higher prices (strictlymedicinals comes to mind) but I went for quantity as my thumb is sorta on the black side. The comfrey is thriving in a variety of pots that I’ll move into the greenhouse even though it’s supposed to survive at -40 degrees. I want them to be root bound when I plant them on the north side of the house in March. Texas sun is brutal in the summer.

        Also, salt is a good thing to have on hand in large quantities for baking bread, as a brine for beans so they cook faster and for teeth when all the toothpaste is gone. Evil sugar too as sweet treats are good for the soul in hard times.

      • Bassethound-mama

        Member
        March 8, 2023 at 1:33 pm

        I love your reply. I’m newer than you are to herbals, but some things I’ve used since childhood (elderberry, culinary herbs). Where did you find goldenseal seed? I know it endangered and would be interested in starting a patch.

    • Emil

      Member
      March 8, 2023 at 11:41 am

      Do you need a prescription from your doctor?

      • Emil

        Member
        March 8, 2023 at 11:44 am

        For the Jade antibiotics

  • Aelrik

    Member
    October 14, 2022 at 2:15 am

    Ammo & extra mag’s.

    • BiggKidd

      Member
      October 14, 2022 at 2:22 am

      Not a bad idea at all. Only thing is that seems to be one of the things most preppers jump at first out of the gate. Even though the odds of needing guns and ammo before food & water is pretty slim. I’m not knocking what you’re saying just trying to get people to think about what they as individuals may have overlooked. Be it clothes for after SHTF weight loss or shoes for your child ten years from now when they are fifteen.

      • BiggKidd

        Member
        October 14, 2022 at 2:29 am

        I’m not suggesting anyone got buy new shoes for the next ten years. Then again a few bucks for thrift store clothes or shoes that may never be worn might not be such a bad idea.

      • Annie_R

        Member
        December 6, 2022 at 3:51 am

        Or even material and thread to do patches and/or sew new garments.

  • Jeremy-aka-One-Step-Closer

    Member
    October 14, 2022 at 2:28 am

    Tools. I try to get things on sale that i have a decent chance of using in the future. Like tomorrow I’m going to Harbor Freight to pick up an angle grinder and some tarps. I don’t them right now, but I can see myself using them in the near future. Also I like to get useful books, like books on canning, gardening, fixing things, etc.

  • Aelrik

    Member
    October 14, 2022 at 2:37 am

    If y’all cannot defend & retain your food, water, tools, home, family when shtf; then y’all don’t actually have it. Just sayin

    • BiggKidd

      Member
      October 14, 2022 at 2:43 am

      You’re preaching to the quire! I have carried everyday for over 20 years. Once you or I or the guy next door has a 100 rounds or a 1000 rounds it’s time to move past it to other items you are much more likely to need and need bad. Once you have them then pick up another 10,000 or 100,000 or whatever suits your fancy.

    • DrumminSon

      Member
      October 14, 2022 at 3:49 am

      Yeah there will come a time when others will look at your garden and see a food bank and if you can’t or won’t defend it you will be without…

  • KimC

    Member
    October 14, 2022 at 2:52 am

    A while back I stocked up on OTC items for various ailments that I’ve never even dealt with, such as fungal issues of multiple types, UTI, and several others. The Organic Prepper has an extensive list of useful OTC products in one of their articles with names (not brands) of actual items and what they’re used for, which was quite helpful. I also buy chapstick or lip balm with just about every grocery shopping as it comes in handy not only for dry or chapped lips, but is supposed to be combustible with cotton balls or dryer lint as a fire starter. I also recently saw a YT video on using lard in glass jars with birthday or taper candles in the center as a hand warming heat source as well as light in case of power outages. They said a large container of lard (three pounds I think) would burn for (I believe he said) six or eight hours a day for 72 days with a single taper candle in the center functioning as a wick. They claimed it’s odorless. The dollar store near me sells pint jars with lids and tall birthday candles, and generic lard seemed quite cost effective when I did a price check.

    Patriot Nurse (on YT) addressed the medication longevity issue in a video and said that most of them will last for many, many years (I think 10 or more) when kept cool, dry and dark (sealed properly and refrigerated). There is one antibiotic that is not safe long-term and she named it. Might have been tetracycline or doxycycline? I recommend you watch her video on the subject to be certain as it’s been quite a long time since I saw it and am not certain of the name. I believe she was citing a government study that confirmed the efficacy of meds after being stored properly for many years.

    • BiggKidd

      Member
      October 14, 2022 at 2:58 am

      That’s great. You got me on that one I don’t have any OTC stuff that I don’t already use. Yes I do have those stored but items I’ve never needed or used I don’t, again great idea.

      I also agree with @Wilburs-Place about keeping meds and I do so but I also have the books and some seeds and plants.

      • KimC

        Member
        October 14, 2022 at 3:02 am

        My thinking is that even if I don’t need some of those things myself, they’ll potentially help a friend or family member or become an item I can barter to someone having an acute issue. Besides, just because I haven’t needed them yet doesn’t mean I might not in the future, particularly if everything is truly sideways and circumstances become incredibly stressful, thereby possibly contributing to lowering people’s immune systems, etc.

    • JulieDogmom

      Member
      October 15, 2022 at 11:48 pm

      I’ve been using my OTC benefit for over two years now to gather all kinds of supplies for not only things I will probably need eventually but also things I’ll never need but others might.

      • CarolinaCarefree

        Member
        October 16, 2022 at 1:25 am

        A tire changer is a great thing to have, but word of advise. Invest in the bigger changer from Harbor Freight. I bought the smaller one and it does ok, but it is not good on some tires. Also get things like valve stems and tubes for those tires that may need them. I found this out the hard way when I went to change a tire and needed the valve stem replace. Also may need the tool to install the stem.

      • JulieDogmom

        Member
        October 21, 2022 at 4:22 pm

        Thank you for the advice. I’ve had valve stems and similar items on my Lowe’s wishlist for some time now but they’ve been out of stock for just as long. I can generally “think” about all these things, but getting them (very limited budget) and/or using them (knowledge/skills) is an entirely different story. At the very least I’d like to have the things that’ll be needed and hopefully find the ones with the knowledge and skills to use them, or at least teach me how to. Because I know there’ll come a day when some of these things are going to come in incredibly handy, not only for me but others that’re going to need them too.

      • RedFlyerRebecca

        Member
        October 21, 2022 at 4:37 pm

        Julie, my skillset grows as my need to fix something on a tight budget grows. Almost all the auto parts stores will have the small items like valve stems, tire patch kits, patch glue and tire change spoons. My estimation on if I can do something or not is based on 1) can I find instructions? 2) can I find or own the proper tools? 3) If it takes brute force, can I fake it? I learned that I can squeeze a small motorcycle tire with a furniture clamp to break a bead & for car tires & the bigger motorcycle, I use a 6 ton jack and the rear bumper of my bus. All I have to do is jack it up. Works like a charm! Also, 3 spoons isn’t enough for me. I use 6. They are relatively cheap & having more makes the job go much faster and easier.

      • JulieDogmom

        Member
        October 21, 2022 at 5:35 pm

        I love #3😁That’s definitely me. This is the one I found to “help out” since my fake it skills are pretty rusty these days.

      • BiggKidd

        Member
        October 21, 2022 at 11:53 pm

        Another way to pop a bead loose is to lay a board across one edge of the tire and run up on it with another vehicle.

      • RedFlyerRebecca

        Member
        October 22, 2022 at 1:12 am

        I would hurt myself doing this with the motorcycle. Ha!

      • BiggKidd

        Member
        October 22, 2022 at 4:21 am

        Yeah! Unless you were working on another motorcycle tire.

      • Beachchic

        Member
        October 22, 2022 at 2:11 pm

        BiggKidd my hubby does this too, always has! Hes used a loader bucket, another car, whatever he could find. Weve always done our own tires, much cheaper! The only thing he cant do is balance them but we do alignments and changing tires out and so on. Its a great skill to have!

      • BiggKidd

        Member
        October 22, 2022 at 2:22 pm

        Harbor Freight sells a bubble balancer that forks fine for standard tires. Maybe not the best for high speed IE: racing / speed rated tires.

      • Beachchic

        Member
        October 22, 2022 at 2:36 pm

        Thanks I will mention that to him!

      • KimC

        Member
        November 21, 2022 at 11:05 pm

        Excellent idea! I will be checking into this. Thanks.

  • Summerhat-n-Chicks

    Member
    October 14, 2022 at 3:00 am

    I stocked up on nails/screws, duct tape and a set of hand saws, tactical knifes . I also set aside a good pair of boots and, yes, reading glasses in various magnifications from the dollar store, they’re cheep and can be used for barter .

  • Aelrik

    Member
    October 14, 2022 at 4:04 am

    Great discussion all. And I now have added a few more items to list 👍

    • BiggKidd

      Member
      October 14, 2022 at 4:07 am

      That’s great!

  • Pukalani-Farm

    Member
    October 14, 2022 at 4:25 am

    What I am noticing is we need tools to FIX everything we own because parts are impossible to get these days unless you want to wait 6 months. We ordered a freezer and it took 5 months to get it because they were waiting on a tiny stupid part from China. We just ordered a plastic welder which is something we never even thought about. We have metal welders to fabricate metal parts, and wood to repair wood, but lots of things like our mower fenders and tools are made of plastic and now we can repair just about everything. Gone are the days when we could say, “I’ll just order the part and we’ll be back to work in no time.” Now we’re better off just fixing everything ourselves.

    • BiggKidd

      Member
      October 14, 2022 at 4:29 am

      You got that right.

      Did you know you can weld plastic with a soldering iron and a zip tie? If it needs to be strong melt a little metal screen or steel wool down in the plastic as reinforcement.

    • Contingency-Guy

      Member
      October 15, 2022 at 1:42 am

      I’ve stocked up on Superglue, which I sprinkle baking soda on for instant drying and increased strength and JB Weld SuperWeld that has a blue light on the back of the container that dries the glue in a few seconds. I’ve just learned about these this year and have fixed numerous things that I thought I’d have to trash.

  • JerseyGiantChick

    Member
    October 14, 2022 at 11:56 am

    Let us not forget the Bible.

    • BiggKidd

      Member
      October 15, 2022 at 11:18 pm

      Here’s another little something I would be willing to bet most of you don’t have a way to handle. I did three tires today by hand.

      Changing tires on the rims.

      You need a couple tire bars, one of each type and a bead breaker minimum. I made my bead breaker out of scrap steel I had laying around a few years ago. A bubble balancer wouldn’t hurt any either along with an assortment of weights. Also some valve stems and patches. Tubes might not be a bad idea either.

      • This reply was modified 1 year, 4 months ago by  BiggKidd.
      • JulieDogmom

        Member
        October 15, 2022 at 11:51 pm

        I’ve thought about that situation and I’ve added a tire changing machine on my Harbor Freight wishlist. I’ve been gathering various parts here and there for all things vehicle maintenance related.

      • RedFlyerRebecca

        Member
        October 21, 2022 at 3:33 am

        Changing tires is a great workout, especially for smaller built people like me.

  • PackersRboss

    Member
    October 16, 2022 at 9:15 pm

    Re: tools- bought plumbing tools, etc. I don’t know plumbing but if I had to do it, having the tools will help.

    Books: bought books on butchering large game & small game. Good pictures to follow the instructions.

  • RedFlyerRebecca

    Member
    October 21, 2022 at 3:39 am

    As soon as the supply chain issues started, I researched all my regularly used (fill in the blank) items that came from outside the US or were sourced outside the US and ordered a bunch. I have been collecting/saving hardware, nuts bolts screws, hand tools, anything that repairs what I have. Also, researched what breaks on each of my vehicles or needs replaced in the future. Example: timing belt in my car will need replaced in 20,000 miles, so I got one now. I live on rough roads that are hard on suspension, so I got replacements. Have enough oil and filters for a few changes.

    • BiggKidd

      Member
      October 21, 2022 at 3:47 am

      Good job that’s a smart move!

    • JulieDogmom

      Member
      October 21, 2022 at 4:32 pm

      Agreed! I got supplies for a couple oil changes, extra air filters (the washable/reusable kind), a couple sets of wiper blades, antifreeze, windshield washer fluid, a serpentine belt (although I still don’t know if I need a separate belt for the ac), various fluids and gaskets, stop leak, a windshield repair kit … and various other necessary parts. I’m not done yet by far but I figure every step closer is an accomplishment.

  • SoilToSoulMS

    Member
    October 21, 2022 at 4:25 am

    It may not be much, but better than nothing to have a good supply of duct tape and rope and twine! Never know what you might need it for. Also, some white cotton sheets for use in wound care, might be more affordable than a bunch of gauze pads and bandages, and could also have multiple uses. Thinking outside the box will prove very useful.

    • BiggKidd

      Member
      October 21, 2022 at 4:42 am

      You might want to add women’s sanitary products to your list. They work great for stopping up wounds. Tampons make a great hole filler to stop up a large puncture wound and pads work well on gashes, cuts, and things of that nature.

      • This reply was modified 1 year, 4 months ago by  BiggKidd.
      • SoilToSoulMS

        Member
        October 21, 2022 at 12:43 pm

        Yes, very good ideas!

      • JulieDogmom

        Member
        October 21, 2022 at 3:17 pm

        When women’s sanitary products went into shortage I started stockpiling what I could get. I now have a 50gal tote full of women’s sanitary/hygiene items to help those who might need them. I even added feminine wash, yeast inf treatments, cramp meds and UTI pain relief meds. I remember how cruddy those times were and in SHTF I didn’t want that to be an extra stressor. I’ve also started another tote specifically for seniors or those with certain special needs and it’s being stocked with incontinence products for both men and women, extra reading glasses, lip balm and whatever else I can think of that might be helpful.

      • BentNeedle

        Member
        October 21, 2022 at 5:04 pm

        I bought toiletries, diapers and sanitary supplies back in my couponing days. I sewed cloth diapers for both my babies ( a looong time ago before it became fashionable again!) so I expect I’ll be sewing them again along with menstrual pads for those survivors that can handle the yuck factor of washing out poo and blood. The expired bleach, pool shock and chlorine tablets may not work for purifying drinking water but should still be OK for cleaning.

      • JulieDogmom

        Member
        October 21, 2022 at 5:44 pm

        You are absolutely brilliant! Before I learned about the fairly quick expiration of liquid bleach, peroxide etc. I had already LOADED up on it. At least now I know that’ll still be of some kind of use even if not for water purification. Does powdered pool shock have a similar degradation issue? I figured the powdered should last infinitely longer than liquid.

      • BiggKidd

        Member
        October 21, 2022 at 7:33 pm

        We are using powdered bleach / pool shock from 5-10 years ago it works just fine. No telling how much money that five gallon container of powder has saved me since then. IIRC it was around $50 back then

  • Beachchic

    Member
    October 22, 2022 at 2:33 pm

    I didnt read through all the coments because there are so many, you all are so good!

    I try and thing about small stuff you wouldnt normally think about till its needed.

    •Books this to me is one of the most important things, you can learn to do just about anything! I have a large library of books, I am a book worm!

    •Plastic and/or tarps: you may need to cover a broken window, keep a sick person in a room off from others, cover flooring around a sick person.

    •Various screws, nails, bolts, nuts

    •Super glue, duck tape, jb weld, various zipties

    •Car window sun blockers: forgive me I had a brain fart cant think of the name. But these are so cheap they can reflect sun in the summer but can draw the sun in for winter, you can make a solar oven with one, many uses for these.

    •Various needles, thred, fishing line and fabric: even if you dont sew you never know when you might have to learn. Major cut, clothing repair who knows. Once again cheap and many uses.

    •String, rope, wire, fishing line (I know this one was mentioned twice it has a ton of uses! Fishing, sewing, booby traps, animal traps, hanging stuff, tying stuff)

    •As BiggKidd mentioned glasses, you may be fine now but whos to say next year or so on you will be? Vision is a pretty high priority I would say.

    •Simple tools, hammer, screw drivers, pry bars, nail pullers, ratchets, sockets, axe, mull, shovel, hoe, rake, madock, pitchfork. Have several of each amd a way to repair them because tools break! Dont know how many times hubby has had to use the grinder to recut a stripped screw driver or a screw. Hes had to fix a broken wooden handle on a garden tool. Things happen when you use stuff a lot.

    •Pipe fittings, pipe, glue, cleaner

    • RedFlyerRebecca

      Member
      October 22, 2022 at 5:24 pm

      You put a good list together! At first I thought you had gone through all our posts and consolidated what each person added.

      • Beachchic

        Member
        October 22, 2022 at 11:50 pm

        Nope, I started reading and was like my heavens there are so many and they are so good! I basically took what we try and pick up once a month so that we can get a good supply of stuff. We will pick something each month and pick up a few of that item… actually we have gotten to where every time we go to the store which is every 2-3 weeks and we get an item and stock it. Tools are going to be a major thing because just like toiletpaper once people realize they have to garden or make their own repairs there is going to be a run on them! Better to get what is needed now while there is plenty and even on sale.

    • Rox

      Member
      October 24, 2022 at 6:18 am

      I want to give you a thumbs up for posting this but there don’t appear to be any thumbs so adding emoji 👍

    • David-in-TN

      Member
      February 8, 2023 at 8:51 pm

      This is a great list! Several items on here that my wife and I hadn’t even thought of. Thank You!

      Keep prepping

      Regards,

      David

  • KimC

    Member
    October 26, 2022 at 8:38 pm

    Follow-Up: After mentioning Melaleuca (tea tree) oil on October 21, today I discovered this article on Mercola.com about the benefits/uses of Melaleuca oil, so thought I would copy and paste it here below (he only leaves his articles up for free for 48 hours now due to heavy censorship). There are even more uses for it than I was aware of. It’s quite an extensive list.

    For those who find this timely and want to read it directly from his site before it’s moved to the substack subscription-only archive, here is the direct link (there are also two videos in the direct article):

    https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2022/10/25/tea-tree-oil-for-warts-and-cold-sores.aspx?ui=b3d13bfca356ac3fc96a54cbc934c9a2cfd5c8030053c39b3a30e53fa6111c21&sd=20210804&cid_source=dnl&cid_medium=email&cid_content=art3ReadMore&cid=20221025&cid=DM1272722&bid=1629157103

    From Mercola.com:

    Tea Tree Oil for Warts and Cold Sores

    <b data-jsid=”expanderHead”>STORY AT-A-GLANCE

    • Tea tree oil is not only a useful natural remedy for warts and cold sores, but it also has at least 25 other beneficial health and household applications
    • Due to its strong antifungal, antimicrobial and antiviral properties, tea tree oil is effective in clearing up dermatitis, jock itch, nail fungus and other skin conditions
    • Tea tree oil is also useful as a household cleaner and laundry agent
    • You might want to try using tea tree oil as an insect repellant or to treat mosquito bites or head lice
    • While tea tree oil is generally safe for topical application, never use it orally; avoid swallowing any homemade preparations made with tea tree oil

    Tea tree oil is considered to be one of the most versatile essential oils. While it has a long history of use for the treatment of skin conditions and wounds, you may appreciate this pungent oil most when you have an unsightly cold sore or bothersome wart. Given its many uses for health and home, I highly recommend tea tree oil.

    What Is Tea Tree Oil?

    Tea tree oil, also known as melaleuca oil, is extracted from the leaves of the tea tree plant (Melaleuca alternifolia), a member of the myrtle tree family, which is native to Australia and New Zealand. The name was coined by British explorer Capt. James Cook in the 1770s when he saw native Australians brewing tea using leaves from the tree.<sup>1</sup>

    The tea tree was highly prized by primitive Australian communities for its unique healing ability. With regard to some of tea tree’s uses, The Australian Tea Tree Industry Association states:<sup>2</sup>

    “The indigenous Bundjalung people of eastern Australia are believed to have used tea trees as a traditional medicine for many years in a variety of ways, including inhaling the oil from the crushed leaves to treat coughs and colds and applying the leaves on wounds as a poultice, as well as brewing an infusion of the leaves to make a tea for [the] treatment of sore throats, or applying [it] on the skin for minor wounds, abrasions and insect bites and stings.”

    It was only in the 1920s and 1930s that tea tree oil’s medicinal properties became more widely known, thanks to the efforts of researcher Arthur Penfold, an Australian state government chemist, who published a series of papers on the oil’s antimicrobial properties.<sup>3</sup> He rated it as 11 times more active than phenol. The author of a 2012 review on tea tree oil stated:<sup>4</sup>

    “The commercial tea tree oil industry was born after the medicinal properties of the oil were first reported by Penfold. Production ebbed after World War II, as demand for the oil declined, presumably due to the development of effective antibiotics and the waning image of natural products.

    Interest in the oil was rekindled in the 1970s as part of the general renaissance of interest in natural products. Commercial plantations were established in the 1970s and 1980s, which led to mechanization and large-scale production of a consistent essential oil product.”

    Tea tree oil contains more than 100 components, but it is mostly made up of terpene hydrocarbons: monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and their alcohols.<sup>5</sup> Through modern distillation methods, manufacturers are able to produce tea tree oil with a clear to very pale golden or yellow color, and a camphor-like scent.<sup>6</sup>

    Tea Tree Oil Works Wonders on Cold Sores

    Authors of lab-based experiments performed by a research arm of the Australian government found tea tree oil to be effective in the treatment of cold sores. They concluded:<sup>7</sup>

    “TTO (tea tree oil) may be a potentially useful alternative treatment for cold sores which is relatively inexpensive, acceptable to patients and which does not have the capacity to induce resistance to systemic antiviral agents. A larger study is required to further evaluate TTO as a topical treatment for RHL [recurrent herpes labialis, also known as cold sores].”

    Research published in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy<sup>8</sup> indicates tea tree oil has shown broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity in vitro, including activity against herpes simplex virus (HSV), the etiological agent of RHL. In this research, patients aged 18 to 70 years participated in a randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    Participants presented as soon as possible after onset of a cold sore outbreak and were randomized to receive either 6% tea tree oil in an aqueous gel base or a placebo gel, both of which were applied five times daily. The median time to re-epithelialization after treatment with tea tree oil was nine days, compared with 12.5 days for the placebo group.

    The study authors stated, “Tea tree oil may be a potentially useful cheaper alternative, acceptable to patients and which poses little threat of inducing resistance to systemic antiviral agents.”<sup>9</sup>

    A study published in the journal Microbiology and Immunology<sup>10</sup> evaluated the impact of 12 essential oils, including tea tree oil, on HSV type-1 (HSV-1) in vitro. The researchers noted tea tree oil had previously been shown to have antiviral activity against HSV-1 and HSV-2, along with eucalyptus essential oil. They said:<sup>11</sup>

    “It is well-known that TTO has strong antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal activity. The antiviral activity of tea tree against HSV-1 and -2 has been reported; however, the results in the present study demonstrated that because tea tree possessed antiviral activity against HSV-1 at a concentration of 1%, but not at a concentration of 0.1%, lemongrass showed the stronger antiviral activity than tea tree.”

    As you can see, when it comes to treating cold sores, you have more than one option when applying essential oils. The good news is, if you have a sensitivity to tea tree oil, you might also try either eucalyptus essential oil or lemongrass essential oil. The video above provides a couple of additional ideas on how to treat cold sores naturally.

    Use Tea Tree Oil to Remove Warts

    Warts come in all shapes and sizes, and tea tree oil has been shown to be effective in treating warts found on the genitals, hands and feet. The treatment for each type of wart is similar: Simply apply one drop of tea tree oil to a cotton ball and press it over the wart.

    If desired, you can apply a bandage or piece of tape over the cotton ball to keep it in place. Clean the area well and repeat the oil treatment daily until the wart disappears — usually in one to four weeks. Alternately, you can apply a drop of tea tree oil directly to the affected area once daily until the condition improves.

    Research published in the journal Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice<sup>12</sup> highlights the successful topical treatment of hand warts for pediatric patients using tea tree oil.

    The oil was applied directly to the lesions once a day for 12 days. The study authors commented, “The case highlights the potential use of tea tree oil in the treatment of common warts due to human papilloma virus.”<sup>13</sup>

    25 Other Uses for Tea Tree Oil

    Tea tree oil has been long valued for its antifungal, antibacterial and antiviral properties. It was first used in dentistry and surgery to help clean wounds and prevent infections in the 1920s and during World War II to treat skin injuries suffered by people working in munition factories.<sup>14</sup>

    More recently, tea tree oil has been added to lotions, shampoos and soaps. Below are 25 anecdotal uses for this versatile oil:<sup>15,</sup><sup>16</sup>

    <strong style=”font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; color: var(–bb-body-text-color);”>Acne treatment — Add a drop of this oil to your normal cleansing routine or dab a very small amount on acne breakouts to soothe and disinfect the area

    All-purpose cleaner and disinfectant — Add one drop of this oil to a cup of water and put it in a spray bottle for use as an all-purpose natural cleaner in your bathroom and kitchen; works well on most surfaces, including ceramic, linoleum, porcelain and stone

    Bad breath — Add one drop of oil to 1 ounce of water and use as a gargle; do not swallow!

    Bladder infection — Mix 10 to 15 drops of tea tree oil into 1 cup of Epsom salts and add to a shallow bath; soak for 10 minutes and then wash the area well with soap and water

    Boils — Wet and apply a warm washcloth for a few minutes and then apply a drop or two of tea tree oil to the area, which should cause the infection to surface and be released

    Bronchitis — Use for steam inhalation by adding 1 to 2 drops of tea tree oil to a pot of boiled water or massage the oil directly over your chest

    Dandruff — Add 20 to 30 drops of tea tree oil to your regular shampoo or massage a few drops directly into your scalp after washing

    Dermatitis — Add 10 drops of oil to 1 tablespoon of a carrier oil and massage into the affected areas two to three times a day until the condition improves

    Gout — Add 10 drops of tea tree oil to 2 tablespoons of a carrier oil and massage into the affected area two to three times a day

    Head lice — Add 20 drops of oil to 2 tablespoons of shampoo and massage into your scalp and hair; leave on for 10 minutes and then rinse. Repeat three to four times a day until the eggs are gone

    Immune booster — Add a few drops of tea tree oil to a diffuser and diffuse it into the air or apply 1 to 2 drops to the bottoms of your feet and massage into the skin

    Inflammation — Massage over any inflamed areas using gentle, gliding strokes directed toward your heart

    Jock itch — Apply 10 to 15 drops of tea tree oil to 2 tablespoons of a carrier oil and apply to affected area twice daily; dust with cornstarch to reduce chafing

    Laundry freshener — Adding a few drops of tea tree oil during the wash cycle will not only make your laundry smell fresher, but will also kill organisms lurking in your washer

    Mosquito bites — Apply one drop of oil directly to bites and repeat daily as needed

    Muscle aches and pains — Add 10 to 15 drops of oil to one-half cup Epsom salts, and dissolve in bath. Add 10 drops of oil to 2 tablespoons of carrier oil. Massage well

    Natural pest control — The strong smell of tea tree oil naturally repels ants and other insects, as well as moths. Make a natural insect repellent by mixing a few drops of tea tree oil with coconut oil or put cotton balls soaked in tea tree oil in bins of stored clothing

    Sinusitis — Use as directed for bronchitis or use as a sinus rinse by adding two drops to a neti pot

    Sports equipment deodorizer — Remove funky smells and bacteria from sports gear by spritzing it with the same spray formulation noted above for all-purpose cleaning and disinfecting

    Stain remover — Mix a couple drops of tea tree oil with salt or baking soda to create a gentle abrasive cleaner that is great for removing stubborn stains

    Sunburn — Mix one drop of tea tree oil with 1 tablespoon of coconut oil and one drop of lavender; gently apply to sunburn-affected areas at least twice a day

    Tattoos — Apply a few drops of tea tree oil directly to newly applied tattoos to prevent infection, or mix with a carrier oil first and then apply

    Toenail fungus — Add one to two drops of tea tree oil directly to the affected nail and surrounding tissue; repeat morning and evening until the condition improves

    Toothbrush cleaner — Use one drop to disinfect your toothbrush, a known breeding ground for mold and bacteria

    Wound care — For minor cuts and abrasions, clean the area well and then apply a few drops of the oil directly to the affected area; use the same treatment for blisters


    Adverse Reactions to Tea Tree Oil Are Relatively Uncommon

    Undiluted tea tree oil has been known to cause skin irritation in some people, but the risk is considered low.

    Authors of a 2003 study,<sup>17</sup> involving 311 participants treated with undiluted and diluted formulations of tea tree oil, said, “Topical application of tea tree oil is associated with negligible skin irritancy. In the group of subjects studied, the risk of developing an allergic dermatitis from topical tea tree oil usage was found to be less than 1%.”<sup>18</sup>

    That said, they also noted three subjects developed a grade 3 skin reaction when tea tree oil was applied, which is suggestive of an allergic reaction. As with all essential oils, I recommend you perform a patch test as a first step to determining if your body may have a sensitivity to tea tree oil.

    Simply apply one drop to the underside of your forearm and wait 24 hours. If your skin breaks out or you have other unexplained symptoms, do not use the oil. Keep in mind that tea tree oil can be toxic when ingested in larger amounts so never use this oil orally, and do not swallow any homemade preparations containing tea tree oil.

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