What pig?

  • What pig?

    Posted by Kh62 on December 29, 2022 at 12:34 pm

    I’m trying to decide on what breed of pig to go with. I want a smaller animal that’s easy for 1 person to deal with, I don’t need large litters, good foragers, and good temperament is important. I thought I wanted American Guinea Hogs but not so sure now. What about Kunekune or Idaho Pasture Pigs?

    Kh62 replied 1 year, 5 months ago 5 Members · 9 Replies
  • 9 Replies
  • Hanidu-Acres

    Member
    December 29, 2022 at 12:36 pm

    We have Kune Kune and are very happy with them.

  • BiggKidd

    Member
    December 29, 2022 at 4:21 pm

    I never had pigs until 6-7 years ago AGH have really worked out well for me.

    • Kh62

      Member
      December 31, 2022 at 12:26 pm

      Could you elaborate? Good, bad and ugly.

      • BiggKidd

        Member
        December 31, 2022 at 2:47 pm

        They are a small breed that rarely gets over 250lbs. They are very hardy animals who if left to their own devices will mostly feed themselves off the land. The meat is excellent. They grow real slow you’re looking at two years to harvest size minimum. The yare easy going and not aggressive like commercial hogs. Downside if you over feed them you end up with tons of lard and not a lot of meat.

  • Carter

    Member
    December 29, 2022 at 5:14 pm

    Kunekunes are very nice pigs to deal with. They are easy on the ground and easy to handle. Kids get in with ours all the time. They won’t have much of a feed cost if you some good pasture to move them around often. They prefer pasture, if left in one small place too long they will pick it clean. Whatever breed you decide, I strongly suggest getting more than one. There is no way to determine litter size, a gilt could have 3 or 4 piglets her first time but could easily get up to 8 or 10 the next time. But you can sell piglets when they are weaned at 8 weeks. So you don’t have to keep a large litter for long. Here in Oklahoma you can buy/sell unregistered kunekunes for anywhere from 200-400 give or take.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by  Carter.
  • AiNt-RiTe-Acres

    Member
    December 31, 2022 at 4:00 pm

    We recently jumped into that ourselves. We didn’t want the struggle of harvesting a 1200lb pig or deal with storing all the meat and litters of up to a dozen. I too was in search of AGH’s but came across the mulefoot. We found a mulefoot mix cheap and we’re giving them a try. Planning on getting some full blooded ones in the spring. They hit harvest between 6-9 months at 300-450 pounds but that’s typically on feed. When foraging it’ll take a little longer to put on the weight. Litters can be between 1 to 6. They are naturally docile and will gladly forage in the field or woods. They offer a good mix of meat and lard plus the meat is a marbled red meat and damn tasty. Working now to get an electric net fence so we can put them to work in the woods. We don’t plan to feed them much rather have them forage and clear out all the underbrush and overgrowth. With them being smaller and willing to forage we can fill the freezer as needed and let the rest forage until we’re ready for another.

    • Kh62

      Member
      December 31, 2022 at 5:48 pm

      I considered those but availability near me is nonexistent right now.

      • AiNt-RiTe-Acres

        Member
        January 1, 2023 at 3:58 am

        I’m over in north central Arkansas and we found our pigs in Clarkridge, AR. It’s a shame we’re not closer. I searched everywhere and all kinds of breeds. I stumbled onto our pigs on Craigslist. As for the American Guinea hogs they do have an official association website with a list of breeders and if you have Facebook you can just search American Guinea hogs and you’ll find several breeders and clubs for the breed. I just couldn’t find any that were within driving range and my budget. I hadn’t planned on getting our pigs yet but couldn’t resist the price. It has me playing catchup now in order to get a net fence so I can get them foraging. I’ve come to realize that when building up a homestead adaptivity is a necessity.

      • Kh62

        Member
        January 2, 2023 at 1:27 pm

        Yeah, I hear you. Thanks for the info.

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