canning home grown cannellini beans

  • canning home grown cannellini beans

    Posted by Templeton1 on October 5, 2023 at 9:40 pm

    Help

    has anyone grown the cannellini beans? i need help with after i dry them, how do i can them for later use?i would like to water bath them , or do i have to pressure can them? how long? i’ve been canning since 1970 but never my own dried beans

    thanks for any help

    FLgarden replied 6 months, 1 week ago 10 Members · 15 Replies
  • 15 Replies
  • FLgarden

    Member
    October 5, 2023 at 9:56 pm

    I would not chance a water bath. I have canned black beans and garbanzo beans that I cooked from dry beans, then canned them with a pressure canner. All of them sealed and lasted a long time.

    • Templeton1

      Member
      October 5, 2023 at 10:25 pm

      thanks flgarden, i still have a little time before i find out, they’re still on the plants , the pods are starting to turn but i would like to have an idea how to go about canning them, i would love to do it like the canned beans you buy in the stores, i use alot of them in soups and so on.

      • FLgarden

        Member
        October 7, 2023 at 10:53 am

        I have a 40 year old ball canning book that I go by. I figure it’s before all the extra unnecessary things were added by the powers that be. I cook them unti they are done. If you watch youtube, one lady that I trust is Redrose. She has tons of preserving videos.

      • MartHale7

        Member
        October 8, 2023 at 2:20 am

        Red rose ROCKS 😉 I love her channel.

      • FLgarden

        Member
        October 8, 2023 at 9:53 pm

        Yes, she’s good. I’m not quite as cautious as she is but she is a wealth of knowledge.

  • BLTN

    Member
    October 5, 2023 at 10:56 pm

    I have no personal experience with canning dry beans, but Jessica at Three Rivers Homestead has canned her dry beans. I’m pretty sure she pressure cans, since they’re a low acid food, but if I remember right she said she teaches her children using dry beans, so it should be a fairly basic process. I wish you well!

    • Templeton1

      Member
      October 5, 2023 at 11:15 pm

      thank you, one way or another, they will be canned or frozen, lots of work growing a producing garden, lol

  • FigureSk8er

    Member
    October 6, 2023 at 2:40 am

    I have had much success with canning dry beans. I have bought dry beans from the store and canned them. I use about 1/2 a jar of dry beans and fill the rest with water and some salt. Pressure can for I THINK an hour. They come out great. However, my favorite way to can shell beans is to pick them when they are mature but NOT dry! If I don’t get enough at once, I throw them in the freezer until I have enough to can. In this case, I put about 2/3 a jar of beans and fill with water etc, since they don’t have to swell.

    I have a problem in my garden of beans rotting or starting to grow in the shell. Picking and shelling before they dry minimizes waste for me.

  • sunshine-homestead

    Member
    October 6, 2023 at 2:52 am

    Beans are low acid. IMO, pressure canning is the safest way to can them.

  • PlantLady

    Member
    October 6, 2023 at 3:54 am

    As long as the beans are completely dry, you can vacuum seal them in a jar and they should keep for a very long time. If you want them cooked – I do that all the time. Another commenter does the same thing – dry beans in the jar (I use 1/2 cup per pint jar), fill the rest of the jar with water. You can add salt or not as you wish – I don’t but that’s a personal preference. Pressure can for 75 minutes for pints, 90 minutes for quarts. Beans aren’t acidic enough to water bath safely – stick with pressure canning.

    • Templeton1

      Member
      October 6, 2023 at 10:32 am

      thank you, thats what i’m looking for, someone who’s done it before, pressure cooking it is then,, again, thank you

  • Squeeze

    Member
    October 7, 2023 at 1:37 pm

    Those FDA rules are more like an insurance disclaimer. They may have been started as guidelines for commercial canneries. People have been canning for quite some time without those guidelines, and pressure canners. Other countries are surprised when they hear the ‘rules’ and know nothing about altitude or acidic. The amish still do it the old way, water bath meats, etc. (3 hr boil) you can tell if something has gone bad. I do both water bath and pressure canning, and use the ‘guidelines’ for the most part, but I dont follow them like they are the end all be all. There are lots of traditional ways of preserving that have been used for many generations that the FDA does not recognise. And I do a lot things that were taught to me from family tradition that are outside the boundies of FDA guidelines. Do what your comfortable with. Theres a lot of evidence in both camps, but I wont change tried and true for commercial guidelines and insurance waiver stipulation…. Ill just leave it at that

  • Jeff-Hill

    Member
    October 7, 2023 at 4:06 pm

    I’m planning to can some white chili, using navy beans and chicken. Do you recommend fully cooking the beans before canning?

    • Amgbluesky98

      Member
      October 7, 2023 at 9:26 pm

      I soak the beans over night, drain, rinse and then cook them for 30 minutes. I then cook the chicken for about 10 minutes add everything else, cook for another 5 and add the drained beans and broth. I bring everything to a boil and let it simmer for another 5 minutes. Get it all into the jars and pressure can for 75 minutes for pints and 90 for quarts. Seems like a long process but you can get the chicken cooking and stuff during the 30 minutes that the beans are cooking.

      • Jeff-Hill

        Member
        October 7, 2023 at 10:10 pm

        Thanks!

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