Billy’s sheep/parasite free

  • Billy’s sheep/parasite free

    Posted by Trinity8705 on December 28, 2022 at 2:52 pm

    I watched Billy’s video where he went to pick up his sheep. They were talking about how they’re resistant to parasites.

    I’m a vet tech, so I’m used to the conventional deworming practices. Help me unlearn this and learn how to develop parasite resistance. Did he say due to the minerals they give that’s what helps prevent/reduce the parasites?

    I’d love any resources/information/even anecdotal information.

    Thanks so much in advance!!

    NitiTheFARMacist replied 8 months, 2 weeks ago 5 Members · 13 Replies
  • 13 Replies
  • mlthompson

    Member
    December 28, 2022 at 3:15 pm

    That’s a trait of the breed. Greg Judy on his youtube channel talks about it when he covers their sheep.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qmXcgQAwdrc

    • Trinity8705

      Member
      December 28, 2022 at 4:54 pm

      So that’s only something that can be done with sheep? Can it not be replicated with other species?

      • mlthompson

        Member
        December 28, 2022 at 7:30 pm

        I would think their type of management styles would work with any animal. After all they survived thousands of years without human intervention.

        Its not a quick or easy process.

      • NitiTheFARMacist

        Member
        January 18, 2023 at 1:44 pm

        100%. This is a management issue. There is no need for any parasitic intervention when livestock are properly managed. Between Greg Judy and Joel Salatin their books cover this in great detail. Billy’s YouTube is full of knowledge around the subject as well as Will Lawton. You can also read Allan Savory’s books if you can stay awake through them. They are tedious but loaded with as solid education.

        The long and short of it is that when Natural Balance in an eco system is restored and honored, nothing poisonous or parasitic is left to cause harm because something is eating it. I’ve seen this evidenced on many regenerative lands. No mosquitoes, no flies, no stingy prickly things. It’s all cleared. Man’s interference causes all these imbalances.

      • Trinity8705

        Member
        January 19, 2023 at 1:00 am

        Thank you for the response! I’ve got some Joel Salatin books from the library I’m diving into right now. I’ll check out your other resources as well ♥️

      • NitiTheFARMacist

        Member
        January 19, 2023 at 1:04 am

        🙌🏼💜🙏🏽

  • JerseyGiantChick

    Member
    December 28, 2022 at 5:12 pm

    Not to short pasture, fresh pasture as mutch as possible so they do not infect them y overgrazing.

  • RenewedHomestead

    Member
    December 30, 2022 at 11:58 am

    Hi Trinity8705, there are several factors at play typically when you get a parasite resistant flock or herd. We actually purchased Katahdin sheep a year and a half ago that had been raised with wormers and due to the grazing techniques we have learned from Greg Judy and Joel Salatin we have been successful in getting a parasite resistant flock. We have never wormed any of our sheep and if any of them were to develop worms they would be culled. Many raise parasite resistant flocks and it starts with rotational grazing, diet, minerals, and selection.

    By rotational grazing you move the animals so they are not eating the grass all the way down which causes them to eat their poop. Making sure they eat a natural diet of grass and broad leaf plants encourages and promotes healthy gut biome and the right minerals keeps them healthy. You also want the best quality, so if one develops parasites they need to be culled from the herd. This is a simplified version. We stick with Katahdin because they are more resistant than Dorper sheep. We wouldn’t mind some St Croix as they are a good parasite resistant flock. Would be happy to discuss in more detail if you have questions. This is something Ben and I are passionate about.

    • Trinity8705

      Member
      December 30, 2022 at 6:46 pm

      So do the sheep simply not show signs of parasites? Or since they’re being managed well and fed to optimal nutrition and supplemented with minerals, then they’re able to just not harbor the parasites?

      • RenewedHomestead

        Member
        December 30, 2022 at 8:14 pm

        Hi Trinity, my understanding is by raising them this way not only are you preventing parasites, but they are healthier and their immune systems are able to handle any parasite issues. Being a vet tech you probably understand this better than I do, but most animals have some parasite load, as do humans but they don’t become a problem. Think of it like humans, if we eat right, drink good water, exercise, and don’t eat food laden with bacteria our immune systems can handle more.

        Our sheep have never shown signs of parasites and if one were to get them we would cull them as we stayed before. Does that make sense?

      • RenewedHomestead

        Member
        December 30, 2022 at 8:15 pm

        This can be done with different livestock following the steps outlined, not just sheep. We will do it with our cows as well and we also do it with our goats.

      • Trinity8705

        Member
        January 4, 2023 at 7:48 pm

        Could you point me to some books/information that could help me dive deeper into this material? This is a super interesting topic for me. A lot of the information on parasites from college I’ve forgotten, but I don’t mind “unlearning” for better parasite management.

        If it helps, I’ve never kept livestock before this past year, when I got my rabbits and quail. While these are currently managed in hutches, I’d like to get them in much more natural settings while still keeping them safe.

        One day I dream of keeping larger animals, but right now I have to farm where I am with what I’ve got on my 1/2 acre suburban lot.

      • RenewedHomestead

        Member
        January 6, 2023 at 2:18 pm

        Hi Trinity, I would definitely follow Greg Judy on YouTube. He has been a great resource. Joel Salatin also has some great books. Salad Bar Beef by Joel Salatin goes over more of a farming scale but has some great info.

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