Cosmic Rays making Mutant Plants

  • Cosmic Rays making Mutant Plants

    Posted by Mud on September 21, 2022 at 11:55 am

    In 2012 I recognized a lot of odd dandelion and rose blooms. Double headed dandelion flowers, roses that formed multiple heads off the same stem.

    I suspect we will be seeing more of this in the future. Save the seeds of mutant plants you like and try to develop something new. This is what our ancestors did and we should thank them for our foods…..The same way future generations will hopefully thank us for whatever goodness we might be blessed with.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dxP0Q06pFfw

    • This discussion was modified 1 year ago by  Mud.

    Mud replied 9 months, 2 weeks ago 11 Members · 16 Replies
  • 16 Replies
  • dbarker54

    Member
    October 17, 2022 at 6:05 pm

    This was a strange growing season for me! I had a volunteer patty pan squash (I thought) that mutated into almost a small orange pumpkin-like thing. When they were small they tasted really good but I haven’t any idea what they cross-pollinated with in the year prior. I saved a couple to see what they make next year. There were lots of tomatoes that were doubled and even some peppers. A few other strange things happened in the garden this summer, also, such as insects I never saw before.

    • Mud

      Member
      October 17, 2022 at 9:28 pm

      This year we had beefsteak tomatoes grow no larger than cherry tomatoes and had the signature sungold flavor and coloration. My spinach seeded out to over 6 feet tall and my purple Russian fingerlings now have white eyes.

      Most of my plants did something odd this year.

  • DebbieS

    Member
    October 18, 2022 at 1:15 am

    I planted Black Beauty eggplant seeds from Burpee which I believe were cross pollinated with Tai eggplant by the seed supplier. Some turned from green to yellow, others were dark but all were round instead of the classic pear shape. They were edible but loaded with seeds which I didn’t care for. No seed saving there.

    • Mud

      Member
      October 18, 2022 at 3:52 pm

      You must choose plants that bear new positive qualities, if too many seeds is an issue….Then try to find one plant that does not produce so many seeds in the fruit. It’s a simple selection process of keeping the good qualities and weeding out the bad qualities. Keep up the good work.

      • BentNeedle

        Member
        October 18, 2022 at 4:55 pm

        Looking for “positive qualities” is how I ended up with so many different varieties of seeds in my collection! The trials this year were winter squash with just about every moschata I could find. The winners were Trombocino and Ramplicante and yes, this variety has very few seeds comparatively. Our spring crop of tomato plants had twisted leaves and we suspected Grazon as we had gotten a fresh load of dairy compost. Ended up pulling them all up and started new seeds of every heat tolerant variety I could find. Many of them survived the endless 100F temps here in Texas, flowered when it cooled down but fruit is sparse. We shall have our tomatoes by growing Tiny Tims in the house!

        As for the Grazon, it wasn’t as the pea and beans I tested were just fine and everything else we grew in the same soil wasn’t twisted. Still a mystery.

        The sweet peppers did poorly (too hot!) but are now producing and we ended up with a purple jalapeno that I’ve never planted in my life. Weird summer indeed.

      • Bluesky63

        Member
        November 14, 2022 at 2:42 am

        My peppers did not do as well as usual. Though there was one banana pepper that produced more peppers than the other 6 plants combined. I am drying seeds from that plant.

        Bell peppers did very poorly.

  • Raspberry

    Member
    November 14, 2022 at 2:58 am

    I found some red chilis seeds I’d forgotten about in my seed stash that I saved from my 2010 garden and I decided to give them a whirl. Not having any real expectations for how 12 year old seeds would grow, I started 6 plants but ended up with 3 doubles, so a total of 9 plants. Those plants went crazy! I’ve never seen red chilis grow so big or produce so many peppers and they just kept producing and producing and producing peppers. I made sure to save a couple of those for seed.

    • Mud

      Member
      November 14, 2022 at 11:46 pm

      Not many plant seeds will survive 5+ years of dormancy in my experience.

  • Maranatha

    Member
    December 6, 2022 at 5:32 am

    I had several plants produce Siamese twins: yellow squash, eggplant, tomatoes and huckleberry. All joined at the top but definitely two distinct fruits.

  • Squeeze

    Member
    December 6, 2022 at 1:25 pm

    What does barium, and aluminum (supposedly the 2 main ingredients in chemtrails, or at least consistently discovered) do in larger concentrations in soil?

    • Mud

      Member
      December 19, 2022 at 1:01 am

      So aluminum can be taken up by some plants. Not sure on barium.

      IMHO teflon aluminum pans are made because fluorine ions mimic iodine and pass thru the blood barrier.

      I suspect that aluminum also is carried into the brain and acts as an oxidizer, thus causing Alzheimer’s and other neurological conditions. When brain cells no longer conduct electricity, they die and are disposed of essentially. Alzheimer’s is basically this from what I understand, large areas of the brain that no longer function and empty spaces form.

      What I do is add something into my diet that passes the brain blood barrier that does not oxidize and also conducts electricity very well. Hope this helps.

  • Louisiana

    Member
    December 7, 2022 at 2:03 pm

    Not just the chemicals but E coli is raining down!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_W6jojYN2ZM&ab_channel=KayeKittrellLateBloomer

    • JerseyGiantChick

      Member
      December 7, 2022 at 2:51 pm

      Somebody in the Netherlands had a e coli poisoning, ended up in the Hospital with ambulance.

  • Raspberry

    Member
    November 19, 2022 at 2:20 pm

    I store all my seeds in the crisper drawer of a refrigerator.

    I find, stored properly, some seeds can last many, many years. I had tomato and different herb seeds that lasted 10+ years and still had an 80-90% germination rate.

    One exception I’ve found to that rule is onions and chive seeds, anything in the allium family, doesn’t last as long.

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